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Best Canon cameras 2024

The Canon legacy boasts high quality lenses, cutting-edge technology, and professional-level specs for both videos and photos. Although those accolades don’t come cheap, they’re well-worth the upfront cost. Indeed, there’s a reason so many professional photographers swear by Canon cameras.


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After decades of industry leadership, the number of different Canon camera models has grown into the triple digits. As a result, it can be overwhelming to compare all the options and decide on a single model. That’s why the team here at Pocket-lint decided to put our heads together and compile this list of the best Canon cameras on the market today. I’m a professional photographer, and my community consists of other pros, tech nerds, and filmmakers, too. Take our expert word for it: these picks are the cream of the crop.


Best Canon cameras: Our experts’ favorite models

Canon EOS R6 Mark II camera

Canon EOS R6 Mark II

1. Best overall Canon camera

The hybrid flagship that can do it all

$2299 $2499 Save $200

The Canon EOS R6 Mark II is a fresh new face on the full-frame market, bringing all the latest technologies for autofocusing, video, photography, and stabilization.

Pros

  • Great value
  • Advanced autofocus with subject tracking
  • 40fps burst shooting rate
  • 4K60p max video resolution
  • Full-frame 24.2MP sensor
Cons

  • In-body stabilization can struggle with long focal lengths

We dubbed the Canon EOS R6 Mark II a “jack of all trades” in our review. This is a true hybrid camera, meaning it excels at both still photography and videography. The photos reach a max resolution of 24.2MP, while the videos top out at 4K at 60fps. And with “machine-learning” autofocus, in-body stabilization, and a mind-blowing 40fps continuous drive, the EOS R6 Mark II checks all the boxes for a professional workhorse.


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Canon EOS R6 Mark II review: Jack of all trades

Canon’s second-gen R6 brings with it some welcome improvements, including improved autofocus, increased resolution and no more recording limits.

For photographers, the sensor-shift stabilization is a boon. With a CIPA rating of eight stops, it expands the possibilities for exposure, since you don’t have to crank up your shutter speed to its limits to get sharp shots. For videographers, the video capabilities are sure to impress. The max video quality is 4K at 60fps, and it combines with Canon’s famous color science to record at up to 340Mbps. That’s a lot of color and light information, so make sure you get a fast SD card.

Yet for all its strengths, the R6 Mark II is not unobtainable. Typically, a full-frame camera with specs like these would cost several thousand dollars, but the EOS R6 Mark II has a retail price of $2,500, and you might even catch it on sale. Pair it with a nice Canon RF lens, and you’ll have a professional camera for an amateur price.


Canon EOS R5 camera

Canon EOS R5

2. Best premium Canon camera

The impeccable performance of professional design

$2999 $3899 Save $900

It might not come cheap, but the EOS R5 is a top choice for professionals, with excellent specs for both photo and video.

Pros

  • 45MP photos
  • AI-assisted autofocus
  • Capable in-body stabilization
  • Up to 8K30p 12-bit RAW video
Cons

  • Expensive
  • Prone to overheating

Pocket-lint’s Mike Lowe called the EOS R5 the “spiritual successor to the EOS 5D Mark IV,” in his review from 2021. This is an apt description, since the 5D Mark IV remained the videographer’s camera-of-choice for years. Now, with 8K60p video and the latest AI-powered autofocus, the EOS R5 is the new king. There’s a reason I included it in my guide to the best cameras for filmmaking.

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But for all its video-centric features, the EOS R5 performs just as well in the still-photography game. That 45MP full-frame sensor is capable of snapping some absolutely gorgeous images, and the in-body stabilization does its job splendidly, with up to eight stops of correction. The result is a photographer’s dream come true — but you’ll have to shell out the big bucks to enjoy it.


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Canon EOS R8 camera

Canon EOS R8

3. Best value for the price

With great power comes great value

$1299 $1499 Save $200

For those with tight funds in need of a camera with pro specs and advanced capabilities, the EOS R8 is the perfect pick.

Pros

  • Subject detection and tracking autofocus
  • 4K video at 60fps
  • Incredible 40fps continuous drive
  • RF mount compatible with high-end lenses
Cons

  • Digital image stabilization
  • Subpar button layout
  • Prone to overheating

The Canon EOS R8 is packed with powerful hardware. And at about $1,000 less than the EOS R6 Mark II, it boasts comparable specs. In fact, it has the same burst-shooting rate (40fps), the same max video resolution (4K60p), and even the same max photo resolution (24.2MP on a full-frame sensor). So what’s the catch?

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Canon EOS R8 review: Punching above its weight

Canon’s most accessible full-frame hybrid camera inherits some impressive features from the R6 Mark II, but what corners were cut to hit such a price?

There really isn’t one to be found, but the lower price does mean a few sacrifices. For one, the EOS R8 doesn’t have in-body stabilization. Instead, it uses a digital image stabilization technology called Movie Digital IS. It’s certainly strong enough to minimize motion blur when shooting handheld, though it may struggle a bit when using long focal lengths.


The EOS R8 also has a speedy DIGIC X processor, which helps deliver extremely accurate autofocusing. That includes real-time reliable subject tracking of animals, people, autos, and other targets. When you compare such advanced features with the price, the EOS R8 is a steal.

Canon EOS R50 Mirrorless Camera

Canon EOS R50 Mirrorless Vlogging Camera

4. Best Canon camera for beginners

Start snapping without spending a fortune

$580 $680 Save $100

Coming in at less than $700 and packed with both advanced and beginner-friendly features, the EOS R50 is the perfect pick for those fresh to the photography game.

Pros

  • 24.2MP photos and 4K30p videos
  • AI-powered autofocus with subject tracking
  • Automatic capture modes
  • Excellent value
Cons

  • Smaller APS-C sensor
  • Lightweight build sacrifices durability

While it won’t awe “seasoned” professionals, the EOS R50 is my top camera recommendation for beginners. And it’s easy to see why. This affordable camera offers everything from AI-powered autofocus to full 4K video, so it has pro-level specs and features at a fraction of the cost. And yet, beginners won’t struggle to take great shots, even without years of experience.

It’s marketed as a “vlogging camera,” which demonstrates just how easy it is to use. For example, it has something called “Advanced A+ Assist,” which works for both video and photo. This software pulls together a bevy of automatic tools to bring out the best exposure settings for shooting in any type of environment. It gives die-hard manual-exposure setters a run for their money.


The EOS R50 has an APS-C sensor. It’s smaller than its full-frame cousins, but you may be surprised by its strong performance in low lighting. And paired with a fast lens, it can capture plenty of light information in shadows with minimal grain. The EOS R50 doesn’t compete with professional models, but it certainly delivers the goods at a bargain price.

Canon EOS R7 camera

Canon EOS R7

5. Best Canon camera for handheld

Compact, lightweight, and perfect for on-the-go shoots

$1399 $1499 Save $100

The EOS R7 is an APS-C camera with something to prove: mostly that smaller sensors can still produce gorgeous results.

Pros

  • Strong sensor-shift in-body image stabilization
  • 4K60p video
  • Beautiful 10-bit 4:2:2 color recording
  • 32.5MP max photo resolution
Cons

  • Limited lens selection with the RF-S mount
  • Continuous drive slows down when shooting RAW

Full-frame cameras have dominated the professional market for years, but they’re not without their downsides. Those giant sensors require large lenses and camera bodies to support them, and the technology isn’t cheap. The EOS R7 proves how awesome APS-C sensors can be. Its compact build and RF-S line of lightweight lenses makes it a top choice for on-the-go photography. That means wildlife, sports, travel, and anything else that demands portability.

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Canon EOS R7 review: Now we just need some lenses

The R7 is Canon’s flagship APS-C camera and it’s one of the first APS-C cameras to utilise the brand’s RF mount. We put it to the test.

And though it may be small, this thing packs power. It has pro-level video quality, at 4K60p, and a massive max photo resolution of 32.5MP. It also uses a DIGIC X processor to deliver a continuous drive (burst-shot) rate of 6fps.


Best of all, the IBIS employs sensor-shift stabilization to keep your handheld shots motion-blur-free. Indeed, if you’re looking to hit the streets (or the trails) for your photography, the EOS R7 is up to the task.

The bottom line: What’s the best Canon camera?

There are essentially two we rank at the top, depending on your budget. If you want the best camera for the price, go with the Canon EOS R6 Mark II. This amazing model has cutting-edge technology and its hybrid design excels in both still photography and filmmaking.

But if the price isn’t an obstacle, the EOS R5 is the best premium Canon camera to date. It boasts 8K video capabilities and extremely advanced autofocusing, making it our top choice for professional filmmakers. And for beginners, you can’t go wrong with the Canon EOS R100. Its APS-C sensor produces gorgeous, high-res photos, and the 4K video bumps it into professional territory.

Canon EOS R6 Mark II

Editor’s Choice

$2299 $2499 Save $200


How we chose the best Canon cameras

I have high standards when it comes to cameras. Filmmaking has been a passion since I was a youngster, and I first entered the professional industry when 1080p was still considered the best. Through the years, I’ve tested dozens of Canon cameras and lenses, and I know which models are worth their price tag. But to compile this list, I had the privilege of collaborating with my team of fellow pros here at Pocket-lint. These are the criteria we used:

  • Sensor: Canon is one of the pioneers of the full-frame sensor format. Its full-frame cameras are some of the best in the game. We typically prefer full-frame cameras for their excellent low-light performance and high resolution. That being said, not all full-frames are the same. Check for the max MegaPixel resolution of the camera in question to get a good idea of the sensitivity of its sensor.
    • Still, full-frame sensors aren’t the be-all and end-all. There are plenty of cameras with APS-C and micro four thirds sensors on the market that offer extremely high resolution, and they’re often more compact, lightweight, and affordable. The smaller sensors won’t handle dark lighting as well as full-frame options, but they’re still worth considering for their price-value and compact power.
  • Video specs: Yes, 4K is the minimum. Even higher resolutions are preferred. Also, make sure your camera of choice can record 4K quality with at least 30fps. These are the standards of the industry today, and some professional video gigs may even demand 6K. You can also check the available codecs. H.265 is perfectly capable of handling 4K video, though higher resolutions and frame rates may require more advanced codecs like Apple ProRes.
  • Still photography specs: First and foremost, look for high MegaPixels. Anything higher than 20MP will provide enough resolution to crop your photos and add effects and edits in post-production. We also check a camera’s continuous drive rate, also known as burst shooting.
  • Autofocus: Today’s autofocus technology is mind-boggling. But to take advantage of AI-based subject recognition and real-time tracking, you’ll need a camera with phase-detecting autofocus. Contrast detection is good, and it’s fully equipped for casual photography and filmmaking. However, phase detection is undoubtedly faster, so those looking for fast autofocus should make sure their camera of choice has it. Dual autofocus systems, which make use of both phase-detection and contrast-detection autofocus, are even better.
  • Stabilization: For stabilization, testing out the camera yourself is the best way to gauge its effectiveness. However, there are some specs you can check before you buy. The “CIPA image stabilization rating” is given in stops. Essentially, this is the number of times slower you can set the shutter speed to obtain a blur-free image compared to the max shutter speed without stabilization. For example, if your maximum shutter speed was set at 1/800 before motion blur became noticeable, a camera with an eight stop CIPA rating would allow you to use a shutter speed of 1/100.


Are Canon cameras good for professional filmmaking?

Absolutely. While Sony has overtaken Canon as the highest-selling camera brand in recent years, the Canon line has continued to hold strong. The company’s latest full-frame, mirrorless designs are some of the best in the business, and Canons lenses are still considered the superior glass. Furthermore, many of its flagship models boast resolutions higher than 4K, professional codecs, and fast frame rates. If you go with a Canon for your filmmaking endeavors, you won’t regret it.

What lens should I use with my Canon camera?

Canon lenses are considered by many professionals to be the best, and their prices reflect that reputation. Still, you don’t have to spend a fortune to get a solid kit lens. First, you should think about what you’ll use the lens for. If you’re into wildlife photography and action shots, go with a telephoto or zoom lens. If you plan on making films and videos, we recommend a zoom lens with a focal range somewhere in the realm of 28–105mm. And if you’re a beginner, a “nifty fifty” 50mm will serve you well.


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Next, you should consider the mount type of your camera. There are EF, RF, RF-S lenses, and more. Some cameras are compatible with multiple mount types, while others can only be used with specific ones. Some lens types will crop the frame, while others show the full picture. Your best bet is to research your camera’s mount type and then choose your lens accordingly.

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